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Standing in front of thousands of supporters at a May 20 rally in north-central #Pennsylvania, President Trump leveled multiple attacks on Joe Biden, who leads him in an early poll there. Pennsylvanians shouldn’t feel a kinship with the former vice president because #Biden left the state when he was a child, #Trump said at an airport hangar in Montoursville. Biden was born in Scranton, Pa., and moved to Delaware with his family when he was about 10 years old. He represented Delaware for 36 years in the U.S. Senate. Biden is working to convince Democratic #voters he has the best chance of beating Trump out of the 20-plus contenders in the Democratic field because of his ties to the state and his belief that he can block Trump from winning it again. Trump’s campaign sees Pennsylvania as crucial to his reelection strategy; the state voted for a #Democrat in the previous six presidential elections before 2016. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @pvanagtmael@magnumphotos for TIME

José, 27, is searched by a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agent, Frank Pino, as his son José Daniel, 6, watches in El Paso, #Texas, on May 16. The pair, seen embracing in the second picture, spent a month trekking from #Guatemala across Mexico to reach America's southern border. Pino, a public information officer, said Border Patrol resources and personnel are stretched. The agency has faced mounting scrutiny in recent months regarding its care of children who are apprehended at the border. On May 20, @apnews reports, U.S. officials announced that a Guatemalan teenager died at a Border Patrol station in South Texas, marking the fifth death of a #migrant child since December. Read more at the link in bio. Photographs by @paulratje@afpphoto/ @gettyimages

For the first five months of Morgan Lyles’ high-risk #pregnancy with twins, her fiancé Chris Weien was by her side. They’d purchased car seats for their SUVs and confirmed that Lyles would take #maternity leave from her job as an attorney for the state of Ohio. But when Weien suffered a series of seizures that sent him to the ICU when Lyles was 20 weeks pregnant, Lyles couldn’t afford to be there with him. She had only four weeks of paid #family leave—at 70% of her salary—and was terrified of dipping into her paid vacation and sick time, knowing the twins would need her later. Maura and Lena were born on March 2, about two months after their dad was discharged. They were just over 3 lb. each, and both suffered from a minor brain bleed. Lyles exhausted her allotted paid maternity leave before the girls even came home in April. Though anxious about the coming deluge of medical bills, Lyles has little choice but to use unpaid leave now too. The U.S. is the only industrialized nation that doesn’t guarantee paid parental leave through a federal law. If an attorney like Lyles can’t cobble together enough paid time off to be with her sick fiancé and care for her #babies, the challenges can be even starker for the 83% of civilian workers without any paid family leave at all. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @maddiemcgarvey for TIME

A downed power line after an explosion due to being overloaded in Maracaibo, #Venezuela, in April. The country's unprecedented energy crisis left its second largest city without power for long periods in March and April. President Nicolás Maduro, the heir of socialist icon Hugo Chávez, is accused of chronic mismanagement. Since he took office in 2013, he has steered the nation that boasts the largest oil reserves on the planet into misery. The situation—effects of which are felt most harshly in slums like the ones in #Maracaibo—already feels like the aftermath of an earthquake, writes Jorge Benezra, with a collapse in services, constant electricity black outs, sporadic running water. Garbage covers the streets, as people search through for scraps. Read more, and see more pictures from Maracaibo, at the link in bio. Photograph by @alvaroybarrazavala@gettyreportage

In the summer of 2017, @john_urschel announced he was retiring from the @nfl, at age 26, to pursue his mathematics doctorate full time. His decision came two days after the Journal of the American Medical Association published a study showing that CTE, a degenerative disease, had been found in the brains of 110 of 111 ex–NFL players examined by @bostonu researchers. Yes, the findings factored into Urschel’s decision. But he insists they didn’t tip the scales. He had been thinking hard about stepping away, as he was already taking classes at MIT ( @mitpics). Still, the media painted Urschel’s choice as more evidence that smart young pros, fearing brain trauma, were fleeing the game. Nearly two years after retiring, Sean Gregory reports, he says that while he misses the paycheck—who wouldn’t?—he hasn’t felt a single pang of regret on #football Sundays, when he’s wrestling with theorems instead of 300-lb. linemen. “It’s a pretty cool life,” he says one recent afternoon in Cambridge, Mass. “I wake up in the morning, I walk to my office. I think all day.” Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @_tonyluong for TIME

Ramla Ali ( @somaliboxer), the first Muslim woman to win an English boxing title, has her sights set on the 2020 Olympics in #Tokyo. There, should she qualify, she will become the first boxer of any gender to represent her country of birth, Somalia. Her path here hasn’t been easy. When she was a child during the Somali civil war in the early 1990s, her family fled after her older brother was killed by a stray grenade. They escaped via a perilous boat journey to Kenya and eventually ended up in #London. Ali was bullied at school for being overweight, until she discovered #boxing in her teens. Even after she started fighting competitively, she hid her passion from her family, worried her mother would think it was immodest. As her profile increased, her mother eventually found out and asked her to stop—which she did, if only temporarily. Eighteen months ago, an uncle in Mogadishu helped reassure Ali’s mother that the community was happy, not ashamed. Now, Ali’s mother is her biggest fan. Ali is in the 2019 class of Next Generation Leaders, featuring rising stars in politics, technology, culture, science, sports and entertainment. Read more, and see the full list, at the link in bio. Photograph by @nicholasjrwhite

Magnum photographer Lorenzo Meloni first went to #Libya after the uprising that led to the death of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011. His latest series of photographs from April and May depicts the exhaustion of fighters who have again been called to the front lines in and around #Tripoli, the home of the government recognized by the @unitednations that is under siege by the forces of General Khalifa Haftar, who already controls much of the country’s east. Many on the ground told him of the betrayal they felt after having been backed by U.S. airstrikes as they ousted #ISIS from Sirte in 2016, only to be abandoned now. Libya has now become “a small Syria,” Meloni says. “There is fighting but no progress.” Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by @lorenzo.meloni@magnumphotos

It was in early April when General Khalifa Haftar, a naturalized U.S. citizen who rose in influence after helping oust Muammar Gaddafi in 2011, launched an offensive to wrest #Tripoli, Libya's capital, from the Government of National Accord (GNA). Although European, U.S. and Gulf leaders have all endorsed the U.N.-backed administration, Haftar’s Libya National Army (LNA) has received support from Egypt, the UAE, Russia and France. In a phone call with Haftar in April, President #Trump appeared to signal a shift in U.S. policy, praising his role in fighting terrorism and talking of a “shared vision” for Libya’s future. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photographs by @lorenzo.meloni@magnumphotos

While the world’s attention has been everywhere else, #Libya remains in chaos. The capital city, #Tripoli, home of the government recognized by the @unitednations, is under siege by the forces of General Khalifa Haftar, who already controls much of the country’s east. Almost six weeks of fighting has killed more than 450 people, wounded more than 2,000 and displaced 66,000, according to the U.N. Forces allied with the U.N.-backed government reload ammo on the frontline outside Tripoli in April. Read more, and see more pictures, at the link in bio. Photograph by @lorenzo.meloni@magnumphotos

The world is listening to @gretathunberg. Organizers estimate that on March 15, a remarkable 1.6 million people in 133 countries participated in a climate strike inspired by the 16-year-old Swedish activist’s solo action—mostly students who walked out of #school for a few minutes, an hour or a full day of #protest. Since then, the walkouts have continued, with students around the world united by the #FridaysForFuture and #YouthStrike4Climate hashtags. Thunberg attributes her determination to her diagnosis of Asperger’s, a mild form of autism spectrum disorder. “It makes me see the world differently. I see through lies more easily,” she says. “I don’t like compromising. For me, it’s either you are #sustainable or not—you can’t be a little bit sustainable.” Her openness about her diagnosis, and willingness to share about her experiences of depression, anxiety and eating disorders, are another reason why many see Thunberg as a role model. “To be different is not a weakness. It’s a strength in many ways, because you stand out from the crowd.” Thunberg is in the 2019 class of Next Generation Leaders, featuring rising stars in politics, technology, culture, science, sports and entertainment. Read more, and see the full list, at the link in bio. Video by @streiffert for TIME

Hanging out in a park in suburban #Barcelona in 2006, 13-year-old Rosalía Vila Tobella heard flamenco—a dramatic, folkloric #music popularized by Romani communities in southern #Spain—for the first time, blaring from the speakers of her older friends’ car stereos. “It was so visceral. I had never heard anything like it,” @rosalia.vt, now 25, remembers. “Nothing was the same for me after that.” After more than a decade studying flamenco, Rosalía’s innovations in the genre on her second album, 2018’s El Mal Querer, catapulted her to the forefront of the Latin pop boom. The album’s concept—which draws from a 13th-century novel about a woman who is locked up by her jealous lover—originally began as Rosalía’s university thesis. The record’s blending of hand-clapping #flamenco rhythms with pop and R&B structures have earned her rave reviews and, in April, her first solo North American tour. Industry heavyweights including @pharrell, @jamesblake and @jbalvin have since come calling, featuring Rosalía on tracks and inviting her to perform with them. “For me, music is about experimentation,” she says. “I want every record I make to be different to the one before—even if I fail one day.” Rosalía is in the 2019 class of Next Generation Leaders, featuring rising stars in politics, technology, culture, science, sports and entertainment. Read more, and see the full list, at the link in bio. Video by Daylan M. Williams ( @wonderboxla) for TIME

@realgrumpycat, whose seemingly unamused facial expressions shot her to viral fame in 2012, has died at the age of seven. #GrumpyCat—real name Tardar Sauce—"passed away peacefully … at home in the arms of her mommy" on May 14, following complications from a urinary tract infection, according to a family statement. In March 2013, @obwax reported then, "Grumpy Cat visited TIME, and it was awful." She pounced on our office in Manhattan with "an entourage larger than that of many celebrities." The brown-and-white mixed-breed cat, which inspired numerous memes (or "copy #cats"), arrived flanked by owner Tabatha Bundesen and her brother Bryan, the man responsible for Grumpy Cat’s fame. Bryan posted a picture of the 11-month-old frowning feline to @reddit while visiting his sister in Arizona in September 2012. "And it’s not hard to see Grumpy Cat’s appeal: her beaming blue eyes, shining coat, diminutive stature and of course, her permanent frown—due to a form of feline dwarfism—has clearly made her stand out among the Web’s most popular felines." By the end of her life, her community numbered in the millions on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. Read more at the link in bio. Photograph by @elizabethrenstrom for TIME

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